Tag Archives: Angel’s Envy

Angel’s Envy 2017 Cask Strength

Angel’s Envy Cask Strength Bourbon whiskey Finished in Port Barrels
2017 Release

62.25% ABV
$180
Website

What the Bottler Says
Ranked the “Best Spirit in the World” by Spirit Journal, Angel’s Envy Cask Strength Bourbon Finished in Port Barrels is unlike any whiskey you’ve ever tried. Angel’s Envy is releasing fewer than 8,000 bottles of our award-winning Cask Strength this year, so don’t miss your chance to pick up a bottle or two of this rare and delicious spirit.

Perfection is a patient man’s game. So we waited until Angel’s Envy reached the perfect level of maturity. We judge only a handful of barrels exceptional enough for our lengthy finishing process. The result? Even at 124.6 proof, every sip is worth savoring.

A remarkably complex and unfiltered spirit, we suggest you enjoy it neat or with just a splash of water to release the flavor nuances, and perhaps with a few friends who appreciate outstanding whiskey. Angel’s Envy Cask Strength was worth waiting for, now it’s worth sharing.

APPEARANCE Rich gold with an amber depth
NOSE Rose petals, dense fruitcake, fresh strawberries, cracked black peppercorns, clove
PALATE Caramel coffee, dried fig, aged tobacco, toasted sourdough bread
FINISH Rich and buttery, add water to soothe the burn and let the finish linger

What Gary Says
Pending

What Richard Says
Nose: Burnt caramel, fig pudding, and a wisp of campfire smoke. Water opens up more spices like clove, allspice, cinnamon, and a pinch of anise.
Palate: Light roasted coffee beans, Dominican cigars, and dulce de leche. Water opens up a slightly bitter note and some pleasant canned cherry pie filling flavors.
Finish: The finish is heavy on oak and very drying.
Comments: Over the last several years I haven’t seen much movement in the spirit released each year as Angel’s Envy’s cask strength bottles. It was consistently a very good but very expensive bottle of whiskey. This year’s release seems off to me. The wood dominates much more heavily than previous releases and you have to work to pull out the subtle aspects of the whiskey. It is not nearly as well balanced. Also, given the every growing price point I’m finding it difficult to recommend this year’s release. Without any insight into the cask strength composition, this feels like stocks getting released at progressively older ages and then this year it has gone a year too far.
Rating: Average

We would like to thank Angel’s Envy for sending us a sample to review.

Angel’s Envy Cask Strength 2016

Angel’s Envy Cask Strength 2016 Bourbon Whiskey Finished in Port Barrels
62.3% ABV
$179.99
Website
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What the Bottler Says:
Ranked the “Best Spirit in the World” by Spirit Journal, Angel’s Envy Cask Strength Bourbon Finished in Port Barrels is unlike any whiskey you’ve ever tried. Angel’s Envy is releasing fewer than8,000 bottles of our award-winning Cask Strength this year, so don’t miss your chance to pick up a bottle or two of this rare and delicious spirit.

Perfection is a patient man’s game. So we waited until Angel’s Envy reached the perfect level of maturity. We judge only a handful of barrels exceptional enough for our lengthy finishing process. The result? Even at 124.6 proof—our highest ever—every sip is worth savoring.

A remarkably complex and unfiltered spirit, we suggest you enjoy it neat or with just a splash of water to release the flavor nuances, and perhaps with a few friends who appreciate outstanding whiskey. Angel’s Envy Cask Strength was worth waiting for, now it’s worth sharing.

Appearance Rich gold with an amber depth
Nose Rose petals, dense fruitcake, fresh strawberries, cracked black peppercorns, clove
Palate Caramel coffee, dried fig, aged tobacco, toasted sourdough bread
Finish Rich and buttery, add water to soothe the burn and let the finish linger

What Gary Says:
Nose: Rich, luscious port sweetness with dark fruit and molasses, hints of aniseed and cigar paper.
Palate: Viscous mouthfeel with port, caramel apples, plums, and a hint of citrus over oak.
Finish: Moderately long and drying.
Comments: I really do enjoy this whiskey, as I have the previous year’s release of cask strength. It is an intensely flavorful whiskey, on the sweet side to be sure, but nicely balanced (not cloyingly sweet). This is where I would normally rant about the price, and how if it were half the price I would be recommending it up one side and down the other. But I honestly can’t explain prices for most whiskies in today’s market – so, whether it is worth it or not is up to you. If you can afford it, I do think this is a delicious whiskey. But I won’t be a buyer at the suggested retail.
Rating: Stands Out

What Richard Says:
Nose: The nose is a bit coy out of the bottle. It comes across a bit woody and musty (and this bourbon isn’t that old) with a bit of caramel candies. With some water the nose opens to more notes of vanilla, melted peanut butter, and cocoa powder.
Palate: A sweets grab back with a heavy does of semisweet chocolate chips, follow by Big Red cinnamon gum, and toffee crisps. Water pulls more of the vanilla and caramel forward.
Finish: This finishes more on the dry side with a wisp of wood. When water is added more lingering notes of cocoa powder remain.
Comments: Price, price, price. Kind of like Gary I’m getting a little tired of harping on the prices of recent releases. I hear the other side of the argument saying how “under valued bourbon was for so long”…blah blah blah…horseshit. Value is an individual’s perception and opinion. It has nothing to do with price. Price is set by supply and demand. Prices are high because demand is high. And producers of bourbon are taking every advantage they can to maximize profits during the boom. Do I blame them? No. Would I do the same thing in their place? Yes. Do I have to like it? Hell no. It still pisses me off.

All that ranting aside, this is a delicious whiskey. It would be hard to find someone who wouldn’t like it. If it’s in your price and value and range them by all means I suggest picking one up if you are inclined to. And if you happened to invite Gary and I over to share that bottle that you paid for then that wouldn’t be too bad either.
Rating: Stands Out

Angel’s Envy

Angel’s Envy Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey Finished in Port Wine Barrels
43.3% ABV
$45
Website

What the Distillery Says:
One man’s masterpiece, Angel’s Envy is an artisan bourbon inspired by Lincoln Henderson’s lifetime spent perfecting his craft and creating fine spirits. There may just be a spark of divine vision mixed in as well. Recognized by Malt Advocate, The Bourbon Review and Maxim as one of the top spirits released in 2010, Angel’s Envy is positioned as the world’s premier super-premium bourbon brand.

Beyond all the press, Angel’s Envy is Lincoln Henderson’s passion — a career culminating in two fingers of the finest bourbon you’ve ever tasted. To call Angel’s Envy “small batch” is an understatement.

Our bourbon starts with the native Kentucky climate and soil in which our corn and rye are grown, and a pristine limestone watershed rich in calcium and magnesium. These local ingredients are distilled and aged for four to six years in American white oak barrels. Because we want to create a genuinely unique spirit, we age it for three to six additional months in hand-selected port casks to create an exceptionally smooth and nuanced bourbon.

Some people might say Lincoln Henderson has a problem when they hear that he personally samples every batch of Angel’s Envy. We agree — he’s a raging perfectionist. Through every step of the process, he personally judges each batch’s readiness. We hope you’ll be able to overlook his condition.

Mr. Henderson describes his masterwork as “a warm spirit, lacking any hint of edginess, with ephemeral hints of port wine and a rich amber hue.” He explains, “My goal with Angel’s Envy is to produce a bourbon of exceptional character. Even with economic fluctuations, consumers want the opportunity to treat themselves to special indulgences, and I have created an affordable luxury that can be savored.” Lincoln Henderson sought to create the best-tasting bourbon on the planet. In our humble opinion, he succeeded.

Shake the bottle. If you’re lucky enough, you might see something special. We like to call it “essence.” We don’t filter our bourbon. If you’re looking for a filtered bourbon, the shelves are full of them. Filtration can remove up to 20% of a bourbon’s flavor and color. We prefer to let our bourbon live in its natural state. If that means an occasional particle, we think you’ll understand.

But why do we call it Angel’s Envy? As bourbon ages in the barrels, it’s drawn into the charred white oak during summer months and it recedes back into the virgin barrels during winter months. For each year of maturation, 5% of the barrel’s bourbon is lost to evaporation. For generations, this precious lost bourbon has been called the Angel’s Share. After tasting his creation, Lincoln Henderson reckoned that the angels might have wanted a bigger cut. Thus, Angel’s Envy was born.

What Richard Says:
Nose: Buttery toffee, caramel, and wildflower honey.
Palate: Delicately sweet. Vanilla and cinnamon stand out with a little more toffee and fruity notes.
Finish: Well balanced. A little wood spice interplays with remnants of the palate to medium length before abruptly turning dry and fading out.
Comments: I’m really liking some of the new finished bourbon’s released recently. The Parker’s Cognac Finish and Angel’s Envy stand out from the crowd. This is a dangerously easy to drink bourbon. Tasty and well balanced.
Rating: Must Try

New U.S. Releases – April ‘10

I’m late with this again and I’m sorry. I was on vacation with my lovely wife. Without further delay, here’s what we heard about this month.

For those high rollers out there…
Glenfarclas 40 Year Old
Timeframe: The UK launch was 4/29 but I haven’t heard specific U.S. details yet
ABV: 46%
Price: $525
The release notice only gave a GBP price but based on current exchange rates I did the math for you. We know that about a quarter of the production for this release will be coming stateside. I have yet to try a 40 year old scotch but if anyone wants to get me something special…my birthday is in July.

For the microdistilling enthusiast:
Mckenzie Bourbon Batch #1
Timeframe: May 1st
ABV: ?
Price: $45
This is the new bourbon coming out of the Finger Lakes Distillery. Matt and I tried their rye and corn whiskeys at WFNYC 2009 and based on that experience this looks pretty interesting. Due to the small initial supply it’s only being released in New York State. However, if you’re in New York it should be available at around 130 different retail locations. Happy hunting!

We’ve got a couple of retired Master Distillers getting back into the game:
Angel’s Envy Bourbon
Timeframe: September 2010
ABV: 45%
Price: ?
This is a new project led by Lincoln Henderson, the retired master distiller from Woodford Reserve. Lincoln and his son Wes are launching a new bourbon and a new distillery. This first release is being made for them but they should be up and running at their own distillery around the same time.

WhistlePig Straight Rye Whisky
Timeframe: Late spring 2010
ABV: 50%
Price: $70
This is coming to us from Dave Pickerell who used to be the master distiller at Maker’s Mark. Dave found some 100% Canadian rye whisky that he thinks is pretty good. The mashbill is 100% unmalted rye and it’s around 10 years old.

Canadian Buffalo Invasion:
Caribou Crossing Single Barrel Canadian Whisky
Timeframe: May 2010
ABV: 40%
Price: $49.99

Royal Canadian Small Batch Canadian Whisky
Timeframe: May 2010
ABV: 40%
Price: $29.99

Both of these are coming to us courtesy of Buffalo Trace. Matt previously mentioned this release but I thought I’d add in a few more details.

Finally making it across the pond:
Kilchomon
Timeframe: September 2010
ABV: 46%
Price: $70
Kilchoman is finally making it to the U.S. It won’t be until this fall so I don’t yet know if we’ll get some of the Autumn 2009 release or if it will be a new 2010 release. Stay tuned.

Mackmyra
Timeframe: May 2010
ABV: ?
Price: ?
Swedish whiskey makes it to the U.S. I might just stop by IKEA on my way home from buying some.

And finally:
Early Times 150th Anniversary Bottling
2010 marks the 150th anniversary for Early Times and they are putting it out in a special 375ml bottle for the occasion. The retail should be around $11.99 if you’re interested.

That’s it. If you know of anything I missed then please let me know.

Drink wisely my friends,

Richard